Tuesday, July 22, 2014

The Sacred and the Profane



The Sacred and the Profane

A Novel by William Michaels (19??-?).

New York: St. Martin's Press, 1989. 474 pages.

Set mostly in Altoona, The Sacred and the Profane (1989) is a tumultuous story about Alex Stribling, a young Roman Catholic priest assigned to a parish in his hometown and who struggles-against-lust with the locals.

William Michaels is a fiction writer with a previous book, a thriller called The Night They Stole Manhattan.
  
Genre: Romance Novel
Subgenres: Catholic Novel
Time: 20th-century, 1950s, 1960s, 1955, 1966, 1967, 1968
Place: Blair County, Cambria County, Allegheny Mountains, Juniata River, Altoona, Johnstown
Keywords: Vietnam War, Pennsylvania Railroad, Roman Catholics, Roman Catholic priests, Roman Catholic bishops, abortion, Pittsburgh Pirates, Pennsylvania Dutch (Amish Americans)

Monday, July 21, 2014

Dva Svety (screenplay)

Thomas Bell, Novelist


Dva Svety [Two Worlds]

A Screenplay by Dusan Siroky (?-?and Stefan Sokol (?-?based on the novel by Thomas Bell (1903-1961) and translated into Slovak by Jan Trachta (?-?).

Bratislava: Slovenska Televizia, 1976. 80 minutes. 129 pages.

In 1976 Slovak Television produced its movie adaptation of Thomas Bell's classic Pittsburgh novel. Dva Svety [Two Worlds] (1949) is the first Slovak translation of Out of This Furnace (1941)the semi-autobiographical family saga of three generations of an immigrant Slovak and Rusyn familythe Dobrejcaks—from 1881 to 1937 in the steel mills of Braddock and Homestead.

The script of the screenplay is now held by the Slovak National Library in Martin, Slovakia.

The novel arguably became the most memorable Pittsburgh Novel after 1976, when Professor David Demarest of Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh Press reissued this long out-of-print working-class novel during the American Bicentennial. Out of This Furnace soon became a Western Pennsylvania bestseller and classic.

Thomas Bell was born and raised Adalbert Thomas Belejcak in Braddock to immigrant parents. His father was a steelworker and bartender. At 15 Bell went to work in the mills, became an electrician by trade, but in 1922 left Braddock for a brief stint in the merchant marine, then settled in New York for a career in writing. He completed five novels, some adapted for Broadway and Hollywood, and a memoir about his struggle with cancer. He died in California and In the Midst of Life was published posthumously.
  
Genre: Literary Novel
Subgenres: Saga, Immigration Novel, Labor Novel, Historical Novel, Books-to-Movies
Time: 19th-century, 20th-century, 1880s, 1890s, 1900s, 1910s, 1920s, 1930s
Place: Allegheny County, Cambria County, Fayette County, Washington County, Allegheny Mountains, Dookers Hollow, Allegheny River, Monongahela River, Ohio River, Turtle Creek, Pittsburgh, Downtown, South Side, Braddock, North Braddock, Port Perry, Homestead, Munhall, Rankin, West Mifflin, Duquesne, Clairton, East Pittsburgh, McKeesport, Johnstown, Connellsville, Uniontown, Donora, Charleroi, Kenny's Grove (Kennywood Park), Monongahela Cemetery (Braddock), Carnegie Free Library of Braddock, Carnegie Library of Homestead, St. Michael the Archangel Roman Catholic Church (Braddock), Saints Peter and Paul Byzantine Catholic Church (Braddock), St. Brendan Roman Catholic Church (Braddock), Carnegie Tech (Carnegie Mellon University)
Keywords: Homestead Strike of 1892, Steel Strike of 1919, Great Depression, Prohibition, immigration, immigrants, landlords, landladies, boarders, industrialization, steel industry, steelworkers, steel mills, coke ovens, Bessemer process, Edgar Thomson Works, bartenders, butchers, storekeepers, trade unions, American Federation of Labor (AFL), Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO), SWOC (Steelworkers Organizing Committee), United Steelworkers, Braddock police, Braddock firefighters, Hunkies, Slovak Americans, Carpatho-Rusyn Americans, Irish Americans, African Americans, Roman Catholics, Roman Catholic priests, Protestants, Baptists, Presbyterians, Greek Catholics (Byzantine Catholics), Andrew Carnegie, Henry Clay Frick, Captain William Jones, Knights of Labor, Carnegie Steel Company, United States Steel Corporation, Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Republicans, Democrats, barges, Pinkerton agents, Major General George R. Snowden, Alexander Berkman, Edward Braddock, George Washington, Reverend Adalbert Kazincy, Fort Duquesne, Fort Pitt, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, Pennsylvania Railroad, pirohi, haluski, Pittsburgh Catholic Charities, Archbishop John Francis Regis Canavan, Unemployment Councils

Saturday, July 19, 2014

Dva Svety

Thomas Bell, Novelist


Dva Svety [Two Worlds]

A Novel by Thomas Bell (1903-1961) translated by Jan Trachta (?-?.

Bratislava: Obroda, 1949. 352 pages.

Dva Svety [Two Worlds] (1949) is the first Slovak translation of Out of This Furnace (1941), the semi-autobiographical family saga of three generations of an immigrant Slovak and Rusyn familythe Dobrejcaks—from 1881 to 1937 in the steel mills of Braddock and Homestead.

The novel arguably became the most memorable Pittsburgh Novel after 1976, when Professor David Demarest of Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh Press reissued this long out-of-print working-class novel during the American Bicentennial. Out of This Furnace soon became a Western Pennsylvania bestseller and classic.

Thomas Bell was born and raised Adalbert Thomas Belejcak in Braddock to immigrant parents. His father was a steelworker and bartender. At 15 Bell went to work in the mills, became an electrician by trade, but in 1922 left Braddock for a brief stint in the merchant marine, then settled in New York for a career in writing. He completed five novels, some adapted for Broadway and Hollywood, and a memoir about his struggle with cancer. He died in California and In the Midst of Life was published posthumously.
  
Genre: Literary Novel
Subgenres: Saga, Immigration Novel, Labor Novel, Historical Novel
Time: 19th-century, 20th-century, 1880s, 1890s, 1900s, 1910s, 1920s, 1930s
Place: Allegheny County, Cambria County, Fayette County, Washington County, Allegheny Mountains, Dookers Hollow, Allegheny River, Monongahela River, Ohio River, Turtle Creek, Pittsburgh, Downtown, South Side, Braddock, North Braddock, Port Perry, Homestead, Munhall, Rankin, West Mifflin, Duquesne, Clairton, East Pittsburgh, McKeesport, Johnstown, Connellsville, Uniontown, Donora, Charleroi, Kenny's Grove (Kennywood Park), Monongahela Cemetery (Braddock), Carnegie Free Library of Braddock, Carnegie Library of Homestead, St. Michael the Archangel Roman Catholic Church (Braddock), Saints Peter and Paul Byzantine Catholic Church (Braddock), St. Brendan Roman Catholic Church (Braddock), Carnegie Tech (Carnegie Mellon University)
Keywords: Homestead Strike of 1892, Steel Strike of 1919, Great Depression, Prohibition, immigration, immigrants, landlords, landladies, boarders, industrialization, steel industry, steelworkers, steel mills, coke ovens, Bessemer process, Edgar Thomson Works, bartenders, butchers, storekeepers, trade unions, American Federation of Labor (AFL), Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO), SWOC (Steelworkers Organizing Committee), United Steelworkers, Braddock police, Braddock firefighters, Hunkies, Slovak Americans, Carpatho-Rusyn Americans, Irish Americans, African Americans, Roman Catholics, Roman Catholic priests, Protestants, Baptists, Presbyterians, Greek Catholics (Byzantine Catholics), Andrew Carnegie, Henry Clay Frick, Captain William Jones, Knights of Labor, Carnegie Steel Company, United States Steel Corporation, Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Republicans, Democrats, barges, Pinkerton agents, Major General George R. Snowden, Alexander Berkman, Edward Braddock, George Washington, Reverend Adalbert Kazincy, Fort Duquesne, Fort Pitt, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, Pennsylvania Railroad, pirohi, haluski, Pittsburgh Catholic Charities, Archbishop John Francis Regis Canavan, Unemployment Councils

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Out of This Furnace



Out of This Furnace

A Novel by Thomas Bell (1903-1961).

Boston: Little, Brown, & Company, 1941. 413 pages.

Out of This Furnace (1941) is a semi-autobiographical family saga of three generations of an immigrant Slovak and Rusyn familythe Dobrejcaks—from 1881 to 1937 in the steel mills of Braddock and Homestead.

The novel arguably became the most memorable Pittsburgh Novel after 1976, when Professor David Demarest of Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh Press reissued this long out-of-print working-class novel during the American Bicentennial. Out of This Furnace soon became a Western Pennsylvania bestseller and classic.

Thomas Bell was born and raised Adalbert Thomas Belejcak in Braddock to immigrant parents. His father was a steelworker and bartender. At 15 Bell went to work in the mills, became an electrician by trade, but in 1922 left Braddock for a brief stint in the merchant marine, then settled in New York for a career in writing. He completed five novels, some adapted for Broadway and Hollywood, and a memoir about his struggle with cancer. He died in California and In the Midst of Life was published posthumously.
  
Genre: Literary Novel
Subgenres: Saga, Immigration Novel, Labor Novel, Historical Novel
Time: 19th-century, 20th-century, 1880s, 1890s, 1900s, 1910s, 1920s, 1930s, 1940s
Place: Allegheny County, Cambria County, Fayette County, Washington County, Allegheny Mountains, Dookers Hollow, Allegheny River, Monongahela River, Ohio River, Turtle Creek, Pittsburgh, Downtown, South Side, Braddock, North Braddock, Port Perry, Homestead, Munhall, Rankin, West Mifflin, Duquesne, Clairton, East Pittsburgh, McKeesport, Johnstown, Connellsville, Uniontown, Donora, Charleroi, Kenny's Grove (Kennywood Park), Monongahela Cemetery (Braddock), Carnegie Free Library of Braddock, Carnegie Library of Homestead, St. Michael the Archangel Roman Catholic Church (Braddock), Saints Peter and Paul Byzantine Catholic Church (Braddock), St. Brendan Roman Catholic Church (Braddock), Carnegie Tech (Carnegie Mellon University)
Keywords: Homestead Strike of 1892, Steel Strike of 1919, Great Depression, Prohibition, immigration, immigrants, landlords, landladies, boarders, industrialization, steel industry, steelworkers, steel mills, coke ovens, Bessemer process, Edgar Thomson Works, bartenders, butchers, storekeepers, trade unions, American Federation of Labor (AFL), Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO), SWOC (Steelworkers Organizing Committee), United Steelworkers, Braddock police, Braddock firefighters, Hunkies, Slovak Americans, Carpatho-Rusyn Americans, Irish Americans, African Americans, Roman Catholics, Roman Catholic priests, Protestants, Baptists, Presbyterians, Greek Catholics (Byzantine Catholics), Andrew Carnegie, Henry Clay Frick, Captain William Jones, Knights of Labor, Carnegie Steel Company, United States Steel Corporation, Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Republicans, Democrats, barges, Pinkerton agents, Major General George R. Snowden, Alexander Berkman, Edward Braddock, George Washington, Reverend Adalbert Kazincy, Fort Duquesne, Fort Pitt, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, Pennsylvania Railroad, pirohi, haluski, Pittsburgh Catholic Charities, Archbishop John Francis Regis Canavan, Unemployment Councils, 

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Clouded Hills



Clouded Hills

A Novel by Elizabeth Moorhead (1866-1955).

Indianapolis: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1929. 381 pages.

Clouded Hills (1929) is the story of Alison Cuddy, daughter of a Pittsburgh steel magnate who negotiates the grim landscape of an industrial city and her High Presbyterian community while striving for a better life of art and culture.

Elizabeth Moorhead Vermorcken, born after the Civil War to an old Pittsburgh family. When her father's steel business failed in the 1890s, she lived in Paris a few years, married, but returned after that failed. From 1910 to 1929 Moorhead taught literature at Carnegie Tech. In retirement, she wrote full time, beginning with Clouded Hills, then two other novels and a memoir. She died in 1955 as a resident of the Schenley Hotel in Oakland and is buried at Allegheny Cemetery.
  
Genre: Literary Novel
Subgenres: Psychological Novel, Women's Literature
Time: 19th-century, 20th-century, 1880s, 1890s, 1900s
Place: Allegheny County, Allegheny Mountains, Allegheny River, Monongahela River, Ohio River, Pittsburgh, Downtown, Oakland, Shadyside, Allegheny City (North Side), Homestead, Carnegie Music Hall
Keywords: artists, opera, opera singers, iron industry, iron magnates, steel industry, steel magnates, doctors, Spanish-American War, Homestead Strike of 1892, Protestants, Protestant ministers, Roman Catholics, Polish Americans, Irish Americans, Scotch-Irish Americans, Scottish Americans, Andrew Carnegie, United States Steel Corporation, Republicans

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

The Cinder Buggy



The Cinder Buggy: A Fable in Iron and Steel

A Novel by Garet Garrett [pseudonym of Edward Peter Garrett] (1878-1954).

New York: E. P. Dutton & Company, 1923.  357 pages.

The Cinder Buggy is a historical and political novel starring John Breakspeare, pioneer of the emerging steel industry in Pennsylvania who leads a titanic battle over whether steel or iron will triumph. New Damascus is a fictitious mill town along the Susquehanna, but the Pittsburgh steel district is visited repeatedly in the novel.

Edward Peter Garret, born in Illinois and raised in Iowa, was a New York financial journalist and libertarian who is best remembered for his opposition to the New Deal and American involvement in the World Wars. His trilogy of novels on the impact of economic transformationsThe Cinder Buggy is the secondgreatly influenced the novels of Ayn Rand. Garrett died at his home in New Jersey.

Genre: Historical Novel
Subgenres: Labor Novel
Time: 19th-century, 1820s, 1830s, 1840s, 1850, 1860s, 1870s
Place: Allegheny County, Allegheny River, Monongahela River, Ohio River, Pittsburgh, Downtown
Keywords:  Homestead Strike of 1892, iron industry, steel industry, iron workers, steelworkers, trade unions, strikes, scabs, capitalists, bankers, barges, Pinkerton agents, monopoly, price-fixing, stock manipulation, British Americans, Irish Americans, Welsh Americans, German Americans, Swedish Americans, Hungarian Americans, Polish Americans, Slavic Americans

Monday, July 14, 2014

Where Red Volleys Poured



Where the Red Volleys Poured

A Novel by Charles W. Dahlinger (1857-1935).

New York: G. W. Dillingham Company, 1907.  375 pages.

Where the Red Volleys Poured is a Civil War novel starring Paul Didier, an 1840s German revolutionary exile who immigrates to Pittsburgh, works on the Pennsylvania Railroad, and eventually enters the Union Army, in which he rises to the rank of general during the war. The first 100 pages are set in Germany and Pittsburgh, and in the final chapter, after the war, he returns to Western Pennsylvania to marry his sweetheart.

Charles William Dahlinger, born in Allegheny City, was a lawyer, banker, historian, editor, and writer. In 1887 he joined the Allegheny County Bar. From 1918 to 1922 he was the first editor of the Western Pennsylvania Historical Magazine.

Genre: Historical Novel
Subgenres: War Novel, Immigration Novel
Time: 19th-century, 1840s, 1850s, 1860s
Place: Allegheny County, Beaver County, Butler County, Pittsburgh, Downtown, Allegheny City (North Side), Emsworth, Harmony, Economy, Allegheny River, Monongahela River, Ohio River, Mason-Dixon Line, Monongahela House
Keywords:  immigrants, immigration, Pennsylvania Railroad, Allegheny Portage Railroad, Pennsylvania Canal, American Civil War, Union Army, Abraham Lincoln, German Americans, Irish Americans, Scotch-Irish Americans, Italian Americans, Harmonists, Roman Catholics, Roman Catholic priests, Protestants, Protestant ministers, Presbyterians, Jenny Lind, opera singers, engineers, abolitionists, revolutionaries

Saturday, July 12, 2014

Videodrome



Videodrome

A Novel by Jack Martin [pseudonym of Dennis Etchison] (1943— ) based upon a screenplay by David Cronenberg (1943— ).

New York: Zebra Books, 1983. 255 pages.


Videodrome (1983) is a novelization of a horror movie (Universal Pictures, 1983) starring James Woods.

When a sleazy producer of UHF television station in Toronto discovers an international broadcast signal featuring extreme violence and torture, its president Max Renn (James Woods) is drawn to acquire rights, but then discovers that the Malaysia source of the signal is a fraud. The signal actually broadcasts from Pittsburgh, and Max sends several employees to investigate.

David Cronenberg, born in Toronto, Ontario, is an award-winning filmmaker, actor, and producer.
  
Genre: Novelization
Subgenres: Science Fiction, Horror, Movies-to-Books
Time: 20th-century, 1980s
Place: Allegheny County, Pittsburgh
Keywords: cable television industry

Videodrome (screenplay)



Videodrome

An Unpublished Screenplay by David Cronenberg (1943— ).

Universal City, CA: Universal Pictures, 1983.


Videodrome (1983) is a science fiction-horror film set in Toronto and Pittsburgh. When a sleazy producer of UHF television station in Toronto discovers an international broadcast signal featuring extreme violence and torture, its president Max Renn (James Woods) is drawn to acquire rights, but then discovers that the Malaysia source of the signal is a fraud. The signal actually broadcasts from Pittsburgh, and Max sends several employees to investigate.

David Cronenberg, born in Toronto, Ontario, is an award-winning filmmaker, actor, and producer.
  
Genre: Unpublished Screenplay
Subgenres: Science Fiction, Horror, Movies-to-Books
Time: 20th-century, 1980s
Place: Allegheny County, Pittsburgh
Keywords: cable television industry

Wednesday, July 9, 2014

Five on a Merry-Go-Round



Five on a Merry-Go-Round

A Novel by Marie McSwigan (1896-1962).

New York: E. P. Dutton and Company, Inc., 1943. 183 pages.

Five on a Merry-Go-Round (1943) is a children's novel about the Sloan family, Pittsburgh steelworkers during World War II who migrate to a mill near Birmingham, Alabama, to aid the nation's war effort. But after driving 890 miles south, Mr. Sloan discovers his steel mill job offer has vanished, and a housing shortage there causes them to camp on a tented merry-go-round and adjust resourcefully to Southern life.



Marie McSwigan, born and raised in Pittsburgh, was a publicist, newspaper journalist, biographer, and novelist. Her father and brother were once presidents (1906-1963) of Kennywood Park. After graduation from the University of Pittsuburgh in 1919, she wrote for the Pittsburgh Press and Pittsburgh Sun-Telegram. She later was publicist for Kennywood and the Carnegie Institute Department of Fine Arts before in 1941 becoming Director of News Servies and Director of Publications for the University of Pittsburgh. In 1947 she become a full-time writer. Her first book was a 1938 biography called Sky Hooks of John Kane, the primitive painter. McSwigan died of leukemia in 1962 and is buried in Calvary Cemetery in Hazelwood.
  
Genre: Children's Literature
Subgenres: War Novel, Labor Novel
Time: 20th-century, 1940s, 1940, 1941
Place: Allegheny County, Allegheny River, Monongahela River, Ohio River, Pittsburgh
Keywords: World War II, steelworkers, steel industry